We test the new male specific scooter: Yamaha Ray Z

The world is changing for easier life and the same is being reflected in the automotive industry. With more people looking to be in a more relaxed mode on road nowadays, the number of vehicles with CVT and automatic transmissions are gaining numbers in the country. The same is in the case of scooters, which are gaining outmost popularity in the country because of the ease of riding and phenomenal fuel efficiency.

 

With the changing scenario in India, Yamaha also decided to put its first step in Indian scooter market. Being a late entrant, Yamaha started its business with women specific scooter, the Ray. After a year of brisk sale in the country, Yamaha decided to widen its Indian portfolio and introduced the male specific variant of the scooter christened as Ray Z. We had a quick date with the new male-friendly scooter somewhere in Goa to bring the new upgrades to you.

How does it look?

 

In a bid to make the scooter more inclined towards the male fraternity, Yamaha has done subtle visual changes to the scooter, which in fact has drastically changed the appeal of the Ray Z. A new black visor, with body decals are among the first few things which can be noticed in the scooter. Yamaha has gone ahead and sure did some bold changes to increase the appeal of the vehicle.

2013 Yamaha Ray Z

The rear suspension now is more visible with the red paint while the steel rims have been dipped in black to add that muscular dark feeling to the vehicle. The instrument cluster now has carbon finished background adding the sportier factor to it. The carbon finish has been extended to the seats too.

 

Yamaha has replaced the rear hand grab rail with new aluminium wing bar which looks more like a part of the scooter design itself. Even though the silhouette of the scooter remains same as the Ray, a closer look will give you many new design changes increasing the appeal as the scooter is being targeted at the college students and the teenagers.

How does it run?

Even though no major mechanical changes have been enforced in the scooter, it does feel a little smoother thanks to addition of roller type rocker arms and low friction oil seals to reduce frictional losses and improve efficiency. The Ray Z also gets a new throttle position sensor to optimise ignition timing.

 

Fitted with 2-valve, 113 cc, air-cooled, 4-stroke engine, the scooter runs on a maximum power of 7.1PS@7500rpm and maximum torque of 8.1Nm@5000rpm. The engine feels very active and responds to the slightest changes in the throttle. The 7.1PS of power does not feel less can reach up to the speeds of 70 km/h without breaking any sweat. The Ray Z is quick and the scooter takes the advantage of being light at just 104 kg to do quick manoeuvres. The suspensions feel nice and stays composed even while taking corners at good speed. The best part being the scooter never feels lazy, eager to change directions when required in a positive manner.

 

According to Yamaha, Ray Z returns 53 km to a litre which is quite comprehensive. We however would have appreciated a front disc as an option!

How does it feel and is it worth it?

Yamaha has done a good work with the posture of Ray Z. The straight seating posture does not hurt the back even while taking long rides and infact, while riding around Goa with Bunny Punia who stands 6 feet tall with a rather large frame, the Ray Z seemed to accommodate the two of us easily.

 

Coupled with wide seats and relaxed knee room, the scooter feels roomy and big. The Ray Z is quite comparable to the Honda Dio but when it comes to looks, the Ray Z wins it all and then, Ray Z is also more comfortable with the telescopic forks. With so much performance and action packed, Yamaha will charge small amount of Rs. 1,750 over the regular Ray.

 

The scooter carries a sticker price of Rs. 57,000 (on-road, Mumbai) and sure will give tough competition to other rivals. Yamaha is going a step forward and has also introduced Ray Z themed apparels and accessories to woo teenagers. We must say Yamaha is doing a good job as of now for the masses but we would love to see something bigger and meaner from the company soon – Fingers crossed!

 

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About the Author

has written 25 posts on this blog.

Shantonil believes in starting young and at just 20 years of age, he joined the content team of Gaadi in 2010. An avid biker and explorer, he soon learnt the art of four-wheels and his expert views can be found on both bikes and cars. Photography comes naturally to him and he simply cannot do without his S3!